M62 Ouse Bridge

Following a recent inspection, we've had to close the eastbound carriageway.

Start date 12 April 2022
End date TBC
Cost

Latest updates

  • 14 July 2022

    M62 Ouse Bridge junction 37 now open

    Overnight engineers have re-opened access to junction 37 and an additional eastbound lane. 

    The additional lane on the eastbound carriageway is only for use by traffic wanting to leave the M62 at junction 37. Through traffic will continue to use the contraflow on the westbound carriageway. Road users are therefore advised to pay close attention to the signage and get in the correct lane in plenty of time. 

    The speed limit throughout the works remains 30mph. 

    To ensure the bridging plates remain in place, there will be a series of short, overnight closures to inspect them and re-tension their bolts. These will take place this Thursday, Friday and Saturday night, for between two to four hours each night, and then every Saturday night until contractors are satisfied the plates are firmly settled. 

    These closures will only affect lane one of the eastbound carriageway and the junction 37 exit slip road, with traffic diverted on to the contraflow instead.

     

  • 14 July 2022

    Updated - Your questions and answers - Ouse Bridge

    Updated 14 July 2022

    What’s happening at the moment?

    In the early hours of Thursday 14 July, we reopened lane one on the eastbound carriageway across the Ouse Bridge and the eastbound exit slip road for junction 37 at Howden. 

    Can all eastbound traffic use this newly reopened lane?

    No. We advise eastbound motorists that this lane is only for use by those wanting to leave at junction 37 so it’s imperative people read the signs and get into the correct lane in good time. Through traffic should continue to use the contraflow otherwise they will have no option but to leave the M62 at junction 37.

    Why has this been made possible? What’s been happening in the last few weeks?

    On 30 May we started work on the temporary fix to the joint on the eastbound carriageway. This involved removing the road surface to expose the bridge deck, pouring a concrete deck across all four lanes of the eastbound carriageway, waiting for that to cure and then starting to installing metal bridging plates in lane one before resurfacing the carriageway ready for opening. We’ve also had to make sure the traffic management system meets national standards.

    In parallel with that work, and to avoid road users having to wait longer than necessary to get an additional lane opened for eastbound traffic we implemented a 2+2 contraflow on the westbound carriageway on Saturday 18 June. This involved putting westbound traffic on the hard shoulder and lane one and redesigning the contraflow to open lanes two and three to eastbound traffic, doubling that capacity, which we know was much welcomed.

    The local MP suggested that change to the contraflow quite early on in this process. Why did it take so long to do?

    Our designers had to look very carefully at the feasibility of opening up the hard shoulder to traffic on the westbound carriageway so we could have two lanes running in each direction. It presented a number of challenges because the hard shoulder is narrow and we also needed to meet stringent safety criteria on the use of contraflows such as having sufficient space for barriers to divide the east and westbound traffic. We needed to ensure the bridge could hold four lanes of traffic as well as the heavy concrete barrier dividing the east and westbound lanes. We had to lower raised ironworks in the central reserve to enable us to construct the crossover for the additional lane of eastbound traffic. It was imperative that this option met the required safety standards so our calculations had to be meticulous. As soon as we knew we could do it, we started the process and worked day and night to make it happen.

    What restrictions are in place on this newly reopened lane?

    For the safety of the travelling public and that of our workforce a temporary speed limit of 30mph is in place. As the bridging plates effectively ‘ramp over’ the damaged joint, this will be likened to a ‘speed hump’ in the carriageway. Ramp Ahead and Ramp signs will be in place, together speed activated signs so it is important that vehicles travel through the works at no more than 30 mph. The layout of the contraflow on the westbound carriageway, including the 30mph speed restriction. remains the same. 

    To ensure the bridging plates remain in place, there will be a series of short, overnight closures to inspect them and re-tension their bolts. These will take place this Thursday, Friday and Saturday night, for between two to four hours each night, and then every Saturday night until contractors are satisfied the plates are firmly settled. 

    These closures will only affect lane one of the eastbound carriageway and the junction 37 exit slip road, with traffic diverted on to the contraflow instead.

    What happens now?

    We continue to install ‘longer term’ bridging plates that will allow the permanent joint solution to be placed and retain a single lane running over the bridge on the eastbound carriageway. We are looking to have these installed early September 2022.

    When will we see all traffic management removed?

    We are working on the permanent solution concurrently with the ongoing temporary work. Our designers are working with our specialist supply chain partners to determine a solution that reduces the risks of full closure in the future in conjunction with the most timely solution. We are anticipating all traffic management to be removed before the end of March 2023

    Is this bridge safe?

    Yes, absolutely. The issue with the joint does not affect the safety of the bridge and people should have no fear of travelling on this bridge in either direction.

    How old is the bridge?

    The bridge is almost 50 years old, having fully opened in 1976. This is a concrete and steel structure which expands and contracts with changing temperatures.

    What’s the life expectancy of a joint? How old is this one?

    The joints are around 50 years old and this one has fractured through wear and tear.

    What does a joint do?

    Joints allow the bridge to expand and contract in different atmospheric conditions.

    When was maintenance last carried out on the bridge?

    We replaced the bridge’s bearings and parapets in 2020.

    Has this happened due to neglect? 

    No. We have robust maintenance and inspection procedures in place which are undertaken in accordance with national standards.  These issues were identified as part of our inspection process.

    How often is the bridge inspected?

    General inspections are carried out every two years while principal inspections are carried out every six years. The last principal inspection was November 2021. We’ve also been carrying out special inspections of this particular joint, the last one being January 2022. Since the end of March we’ve been carrying out daily inspections to closely monitor any further deterioration.

    Why didn’t you spot it before it failed?

    The bridge joints on this structure were due to be replaced in 2024/25 as they were coming to the end of their serviceable life. This individual joint deteriorated quicker than expected.

    Why did it take so long to identify the issue and get out there to start fixing it?

    Repairing bridge joints is highly complex and requires specialist equipment, resource, and time. We had to work with industry-leading engineers to carry out detailed and methodical analysis of the structure to inform our repair programme. We have needed to carry out robust structural investigations and detailed design work that includes precise calculations. 

    The data gathered from this process means we can provide the best engineering solution to ensure the bridge can be used for years to come. 

    Do we not just need a new bridge?

    The Ouse Bridge is a robust structure that has many years of life left in it yet. To build a new one would not be a cost-effective use of public money. The failure of one joint does not warrant the construction of an entire new structure just as you wouldn’t build a new house if you were missing some roof tiles.

    Why can’t you just replace the joint?

    The design of bridge joints has evolved over time and this particular joint is now obsolete so we cannot replace it like for like.

    When you repair or replace the joint, will you replace all the others on the bridge to prevent another failure and more disruption for road users?

    All of the joints will be replaced over the next few years. A key part of the design for their replacement will be keeping the traffic moving

    Why did you have to close lane three of the eastbound carriageway on 24 May?

    As part of our ongoing inspections, we identified some deterioration of the concrete underneath the joint caused by vibration from the increased traffic in lane three. We took the decision to close lane three as a precautionary measure to prevent that deterioration getting worse.

    How did you fix that new issue?

    On Monday, 30 May we began the process of installing metal bridging plates which involved removing the road surface to expose the bridge deck, filling the gap around the joint with new concrete and installing the metal plates in lane one before resurfacing the carriageway. That will enable us to reopen a lane on the eastbound carriageway which in turn means the reopening of the the eastbound exit at junction 37 for Howden.

    How many vehicles use this section of M62 every day?

    Around 45,000 vehicles a day in each direction.

    What sort of disruption/delays are you seeing?

    We have seen some lengthy delays and apologise to road users and local communities for the problems this has caused. When we had two lanes running in each direction traffic was flowing freely which is why we are keen to get an additional lane reopened as soon as possible.

    What messages do we have for people affected by the delays? 

    We appreciate the frustration this issue is causing and would like to apologise to road users and local communities for the disruption.

    Please be assured we are doing all we can to keep traffic moving smoothly, making sure everybody gets to where they need to go safely and with as little disruption as possible. We thank road users for their patience while this work is being carried out. We also advise them to plan their journeys and allow extra time to reach their destination. 

    Is this work impacting emergency services using the bridge? 

    The needs of those using the bridge and indeed the emergency services looking after patients is at the forefront of our minds and we’re doing everything we can to ensure they are kept informed. 

    How can people keep up to date on the repairs? 

    Information about the closures is available from National Highways by visiting www.trafficengland.com and the Twitter account @HighwaysYorks. We’ll also be updating our Facebook page, National Highways Yorkshire.

    For urgent real-time assistance, our 24/7 contact centre team can provide up-to-the minute information on 0300 123 5000. 

  • 12 July 2022

    M62 Ouse Bridge update: Additional lane and Junction 37 exit slip opens Thursday 14 July

    An additional lane for eastbound traffic at the M62 Ouse Bridge, together with the exit for junction 37 at Howden, is now expected to reopen in the early hours of Thursday morning (14 July) 

    Bridging plates have now been secured into place over a damaged bridge joint on the eastbound carriageway between junctions 36 (Goole) and 37, and successfully tested, and the traffic management approved.  

    To facilitate the opening, some small road repairs need to be carried out on the crossover points meaning all eastbound lanes in the contraflow will be closed from junction 36 no earlier than 10pm tomorrow night, with traffic diverted over Boothferry Bridge.  

    National Highways Programme Delivery Manager Phil Jepps said:   

    “We appreciate that people were frustrated when our planned reopening last week had to be postponed. We were frustrated as well as we wanted nothing more than to get the additional lane and junction 37 reopened. 

    “We are pleased to say that should now be happening in the early hours of Thursday morning. We know this will be great news to many people and we thank them for their patience while we’ve been working tirelessly in challenging circumstances to make this happen.” 

    The additional lane on the eastbound carriageway is only for use by traffic wanting to leave the M62 at junction 37. Through traffic will continue to use the contraflow on the westbound carriageway. Road users are therefore advised to pay close attention to the signage and get in the correct lane in plenty of time. 

    The speed limit throughout the works remains 30mph. 

    To ensure the bridging plates remain in place, there will be a series of short, overnight closures to inspect them and re-tension their bolts. These will take place this Thursday, Friday and Saturday night, for between two to four hours each night, and then every Saturday night until contractors are satisfied the plates are firmly settled. 

    These closures will only affect lane one of the eastbound carriageway and the junction 37 exit slip road, with traffic diverted on to the contraflow instead.  

    The eastbound carriageway of the Ouse Bridge has been closed since mid-June to enable National Highways and its delivery partners to progress vital repairs to a damaged bridge joint.  

    Work will now continue to install ‘longer term’ bridging plates that will allow the permanent joint solution to be placed and retain a single lane running over the bridge on the eastbound carriageway. It is hoped to have these installed early September. 

    You can keep up to date on developments on the Ouse Bridge by following the National Highways Yorkshire Facebook and Twitter feed @HighwaysYORKS. 

  • 08 July 2022

    M62 Ouse Bridge: Additional lane and Junction 37 exit slip expected to reopen towards end of next week

    An additional lane for eastbound traffic exiting Junction 37 at the M62 Ouse Bridge is now expected to reopen towards the end of next week (week commencing 11 July 2022).

    Bridging plates have now been secured into place over a damaged bridge joint on the eastbound carriageway between junctions 36 (Goole) and 37 (Howden), and successfully tested.

    National Highways Programme Delivery Manager Phil Jepps said: “We’re now working with our delivery partners to make sure the layout of the new lane is designed in the right way for traffic approaching the Ouse Bridge and making it easy and safe for motorists to exit the M62 at Junction 37. In addition, we’re arranging for the manufacture of additional bespoke signs for the new layout."

    “We have been working extremely hard to get the lane and exit slip road open and had aimed to have them both opened this week. We sincerely apologise for the delay and are doing everything we can to have the lane reopened over the next week. This has been a very complex repair and I would like to thank everyone for their patience while we carry out this work.”

    The eastbound carriageway of the Ouse Bridge has been closed since mid-June to enable us and our delivery partners to progress vital repairs to a damaged bridge joint. A contraflow is currently in place allowing two lanes of traffic to travel in each direction.

    You can keep up to date on developments on the Ouse Bridge by following the National Highways Yorkshire Facebook and Twitter feed @HighwaysYORKS.

  • 07 July 2022

    M62 Ouse Bridge update: Opening of additional lane and J37 delayed

    Drivers in East Yorkshire are advised that the planned opening of an additional lane to eastbound traffic travelling on the M62 Ouse Bridge has unfortunately been delayed. 

    The target for reopening the lane on the eastbound carriageway and the exit slip road at junction 37 (Howden) had been this evening (Thursday). However, the delay has been caused by issues with fixing the final bridging plate over the affected bridge joint.  

    National Highways Programme Delivery Manager Phil Jepps said:  

    “Our teams are now working on site and behind the scenes, to fix this issue and we will do all we can to have the additional lane open to traffic as soon as possible, ensuring the safety of drivers and engineers working on the site.  

    “We recognise the delay will be a disappointment for drivers and everyone who has worked extremely hard to get to this position. We hope the issue can be resolved today with a view to opening the lane as soon as possible. 

    “It is extremely important that we get this right first time and avoid any further issues with the plates once they are in place, minimising disruption and keeping traffic moving smoothly and safely over the bridge. 

    “We appreciate everyone’s patience while we carry out this vital and complex work.” 

    Drivers can keep up to date on developments on the Ouse Bridge by following the National Highways Yorkshire Facebook and Twitter feed @HighwaysYORKS. 

  • 06 July 2022

    M62 Ouse Bridge update - junction 37 access to open

    An extra lane is expected to open to eastbound traffic travelling on the M62 Ouse Bridge tomorrow evening (Thursday 7 July) to ease congestion for thousands of drivers in East Yorkshire. 

    In addition to lane one of the eastbound carriageway, the exit slip road of the M62 eastbound at junction 37 (Howden) is also set to reopen tomorrow. The target had been today (Wednesday), however there was a slight delay in setting bridge plates over the affected joint. 

    The eastbound carriageway of the Ouse Bridge between junctions 36 (Goole) and 37 has been closed since mid-June to enable us and our delivery partners to progress vital repairs to a damaged bridge joint. The layout of the contraflow was also adjusted to allow two lanes of traffic to run in each direction on the westbound carriageway while the temporary repair took place. 

    National Highways Programme Delivery Manager Phil Jepps said:  

    “Having this additional lane open to traffic, and the exit slip road, has been extremely important to us. 

    “While we had hoped to have the additional lane open this morning, it is vital we get this right first time and avoid any further issues with the plates once they have been put in place, minimising any risk of further disruption.” 

    The bridging plates are expected to be in place today. This then provides time to allow the fixings to cure, which will enable the lane and slip road to reopen tomorrow evening. 

    National Highways has been working closely with partners and suppliers to secure metal bridging plates to be put in place over the affected bridge joint as a safe temporary solution while long-term repairs are carried out. 

    Phil added: 

    “Our engineers are now working with our partners, on the motorway and behind the scenes, to have the long-term solution in place as soon as possible.” 

    Drivers who wish to leave the M62 eastbound at junction 37 are advised to join lane one of the eastbound carriageway in good time, rather than entering the contraflow, otherwise they will have to continue to junction 38 and turn around to use the westbound exit at junction 37 instead. 

    Drivers can keep up to date on developments on the Ouse Bridge by following the National Highways Yorkshire Facebook and Twitter feed @HighwaysYORKS. 

  • 18 June 2022

    Ouse Bridge contraflow now open

    We can confirm that we have reopened a second lane running eastbound on the westbound carriageway as planned today.  

  • 13 June 2022

    M62 Ouse Bridge update – Additional eastbound lane due to open this weekend

    An additional lane for eastbound traffic over the M62 Ouse Bridge is due to open on the morning of Saturday, 18 June. 

    We will spend this week altering the layout of the contraflow on the westbound carriageway to enable two lanes to run in each direction. 

    The hard shoulder and lane one will be available for westbound traffic while eastbound traffic will run on the remaining two lanes. Work continues on a temporary repair to the eastbound carriageway which will then enable a further lane and the eastbound exit slip road at junction 37 to be reopened. There will be no access from the contraflow to J37 exit slip road. 

    To enable this to happen, the following overnight closures between junctions 36 (Goole) and 37 (Howden) are needed: 

    • Tonight (Monday 13 June), the eastbound lane and lane two of the westbound carriageway will be closed for resurfacing of the crossovers to accommodate two lanes of traffic.  
    • The eastbound lane will be closed overnight tomorrow (Tuesday 14 June) for alterations to the crossovers to accommodate two lanes of traffic. Westbound traffic will be running as normal. 
    • Overnight on Wednesday, 15 June, lane one of the westbound carriageway will be closed to sweep the hard shoulder, remove existing road markings and reapply them to new locations. Eastbound traffic will not be affected. 
    • Overnight on Thursday, 16 June the M62 will be closed to all westbound traffic for the alteration of road markings to move traffic into its new position  enabling the contraflow to be installed. Eastbound traffic will running as normal. Westbound traffic will be swapped on to the hard shoulder and lane one once it reopens on Friday morning. 
    • Overnight on Friday 17 June the M62 will be fully closed to all traffic to move the temporary concrete barrier to its new position and complete the build of the traffic management. Once it reopens on Saturday morning two lanes will be available in each direction on the westbound carriageway.  

    All closures take place from 8pm to 6am the following morning. Diversions will be clearly signed. 

    Once the new layout is established, the speed limit through the contraflow will be 30mph for the safety of road users.  

    National Highways Programme Delivery Manager Phil Jepps: 

    “We appreciate that this week’s overnight closures will cause disruption but it’s not something we are doing lightly, and we hope people will understand that it’s a necessary process to get a much-needed second lane open for eastbound traffic.   

    “Getting another eastbound lane open has been a priority for us and we thank people for their understanding of the complexities we’ve been dealing with to make this happen. We advise road users to continue to allow extra time for their journeys and plan their routes in advance, particularly during this week’s overnight closures.” 

    Work continues on a temporary repair to the eastbound carriageway which will then enable a further lane and the eastbound exit slip road at junction 37 to be reopened. 

    Mr Jepps continued: 

    “Over the last two weeks we’ve stripped back the road surface and the waterproofing to expose the bridge deck and poured a concrete base over all four lanes. Once that had cured - a process we were able to speed up by using additives in the concrete - we re-waterproofed the deck and applied high friction surfacing on the concrete.  

    “We will soon begin to fix metal bridging plates across parts of the eastbound carriageway, enabling us to get another lane open, although this process could take a further two weeks

    Take a look at our responses to your Ouse Bridge questions, by clicking 'see more updates' below.

     

  • 30 May 2022

    Temporary repairs start today

    Today (30 May) we started repair work on the M62 Ouse Bridge which will enable part of the eastbound carriageway to be reopened. 

    Our team is on site marking out and preparing the area around the faulty joint in advance of a temporary repair.  The aim of the repair is to get a lane open on the eastbound carriageway to ease the impact on customers and road users. This work is not a permanent solution; we'll share more on that shortly.  

    During the work the current contraflow will remain in place on the westbound carriageway, with two lanes available for westbound traffic and one for eastbound. 

    The temporary fix will take around two to three weeks to complete and involves a process known as planing – where a machine with a rotating drum removes the road surface. This, and the use of mini excavators, will expose the bridge deck and enable engineers to build a concrete base across all four lanes.  

    The concrete base then needs time to cure so it reaches the maximum structural strength for safety. Metal bridging plates will be fitted to that base in lane one. The road can then be resurfaced, allowing lane one to reopen.

    A date for the opening will be confirmed in due course, once engineers confirm the concrete base is safe for the plates to be fitted. 

    We know this route is a priority for local people and customers especially those in the Goole area due to the number of watercourses nearby; this means that alternative routes are not always available. We are working as safely and quickly as we can over the Jubilee weekend to get the work done.  

    What happens after we reopen lane one?

    We will be running two lanes of eastbound traffic and two lanes of westbound traffic.  One of the eastbound lanes will be under contraflow on the westbound carriageway. 

    We will then start to install more plates with a view to reopening additional lanes on the eastbound carriageway later this summer until a more permanent repair to the joint can be carried out.

    Take a look at our responses to your Ouse Bridge questions below, by clicking 'see more updates'.

    Road workers on Ouse Bridge, M62

  • 30 May 2022

    Your questions and our answers - Ouse Bridge

    We've pulled together some of your questions from social media and answered them here. If you'd like to submit a comment or question call 0300 123 5000 or email info@nationalhighways.co.uk 

    Is this bridge safe?

    Yes, absolutely. The issue with the joint does not affect the safety of the bridge and people should have no fear of travelling on this bridge in either direction.

    How old is the bridge?

    The bridge is almost 50 years old, having fully opened in 1976. This is a concrete and steel structure which expands and contracts with changing temperatures.

    What’s the life expectancy of a joint? How old is this one?

    The joints are around 50 years old and this one has fractured through wear and tear.

    What does a joint do?

    Joints allow the bridge to expand and contract in different atmospheric conditions.

    When was maintenance last carried out on the bridge?

    We replaced the bridge’s bearings and parapets in 2020.

    Has this happened due to neglect? 

    No. We have robust maintenance and inspection procedures in place which are undertaken in accordance with national standards.  These issues were identified as part of our inspection process.

    How often is the bridge inspected?

    General inspections are carried out every two years while principal inspections are carried out every six years. The last principal inspection was November 2021. We’ve also been carrying out special inspections of this particular joint, the last one being January 2022. Since the end of March we’ve been carrying out daily inspections to closely monitor any further deterioration.

    What are we doing now?

    Repairing bridge joints is highly complex and requires specialist equipment, resource, and time. We continue to work with expert contractors to assess the situation and develop the best possible solution for the Ouse Bridge. We hope to be able to carry out a temporary repair to the joint which will enable the bridge to be opened up to three lanes in each direction. We aim for this to happen later this summer.  Before that we are working on a temporary fix of the issue discovered at the end of May that should hopefully enable us to reopen a lane on the eastbound carriageway in two to three weeks.

    Why didn’t you spot it before it failed?

    The bridge joints on this structure were due to be replaced in 2024/25 as they were coming to the end of their serviceable life. This individual joint deteriorated quicker than expected.

    Why is it taking so long to identify the issue and get out there and fix it?

    We’ve been working with industry-leading engineers to carry out detailed and methodical analysis of the structure to inform our repair programme. We have needed to carry out robust structural investigations and detailed design work that includes precise calculations. 

    The data gathered from this process means we can provide the best engineering solution to ensure the bridge can be used for years to come. 

    Do we not just need a new bridge?

    The Ouse Bridge is a robust structure that has many years of life left in it yet. To build a new one would not be a cost-effective use of public money. The failure of one joint does not warrant the construction of an entire new structure just as you wouldn’t build a new house if you were missing some roof tiles.

    Why can’t you just replace the joint?

    The design of bridge joints has evolved over time and this particular joint is now obsolete so we cannot replace it like for like.

    When you repair or replace the joint, will you replace all the others on the bridge to prevent another failure and more disruption for road users?

    All of the joints will be replaced over the next few years. A key part of the design for their replacement will be keeping the traffic moving

    Why did you have to close lane three of the eastbound carriageway on 24 May?

    As part of our ongoing inspections, we identified some deterioration of the concrete underneath the joint caused by vibration from the increased traffic in lane three. We took the decision to close lane three as a precautionary measure to prevent that deterioration getting worse.

    How are you fixing this new issue?

    We are going to install metal bridging plates which involves removing the road surface to expose the bridge deck, filling the gap around the joint with new concrete and installing the metal plates before resurfacing the carriageway. That work will start on Monday 30 May and take two to three weeks to complete.

    How many vehicles use this section of M62 every day?

    Around 45,000 vehicles a day in each direction.

    What sort of disruption/delays are you seeing?

    We have seen some lengthy delays and apologise to road users and local communities for the problems this has caused. When we had two lanes running in each direction traffic was flowing freely which is why we are keen to get an additional lane reopened as soon as possible.

    Why can’t you open up the hard shoulder on the westbound carriageway so you can have two lanes in each direction?

    Our designers are currently looking at the feasibility of opening up the hard shoulder to traffic on the westbound carriageway so we can have two lanes running in each direction. This presents some challenges because the hard shoulder is narrow and we also need to meet stringent safety criteria on the use of contraflows such as having sufficient space for barriers to divide the east and westbound traffic. If we consider this option to be safe and are able to implement this change, we will do so, although we may have to operate the contraflow at a significantly lower speed than it is running now.

    What messages do we have for people affected by the delays? 

    We appreciate the frustration this issue is causing and would like to apologise to road users and local communities for the disruption.

    Please be assured we are doing all we can to keep traffic moving smoothly, making sure everybody gets to where they need to go safely and with as little disruption as possible. We thank road users for their patience while this work is being carried out. We also advise them to plan their journeys and allow extra time to reach their destination. 

    Are there any other restrictions in place?

    Yes. Due to the layout of the contraflow, eastbound traffic wanting to leave the M62 at junction 37 will have to carry on to junction 38 to turn around and use the westbound exit slip road at junction 37 instead.

    Is this work impacting emergency services using the bridge? 

    The needs of those using the bridge and indeed the emergency services looking after patients is at the forefront of our minds and we’re doing everything we can to ensure they are kept informed. 

  • 24 May 2022

    Additional closures on M62 Ouse Bridge

    Drivers using the M62 Ouse Bridge are advised to allow extra time for their journeys following the closure of the eastbound carriageway between junctions 36 (Goole) and 37 (Howden) in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

    During ongoing inspections of the bridge following a joint failure in lane one, we have identified that the same joint has also failed in lane 3.

    Traffic is now diverted into the contraflow using lane 3 of the westbound carraigaway to travel eastbound. Two lanes remain open on the westbound carriageway. 

    Due to the layout of the contraflow, eastbound traffic will not be able to leave the M62 at junction 37 (Howden). Instead vehicles will be diverted to junction 38 (North Cave) to turn round and return on the westbound carriageway.

  • 13 May 2022

    Work continues to develop a long term solution

    Our engineers are continuing to develop a programme of works which will see the eastbound carriageway return to three lanes as soon as possible. 

    The temporary repairs will allow us to reopen all of the lanes, whilst we work on the main programme of works to replace the bridge joint. 

    The bridge remains safe to use for all traffic and the introduction of the contraflow has meant that traffic has been kept moving in both directions with minimal disruption.

    Recently we met with, Phil Jepps our Programme Delivery Manager to explain the current situation.

    Make sure you find out the latest updates by following us on social media and signing up for email updates on the link opposite.  

Project information

Overview

Routine investigations identified a partial failure of a joint on the eastbound carriageway.

Extensive investigations are under way to establish what repairs are required, which will then allow us to develop a detailed design of the works and a work programme.

These processes take time and we appreciate the inconvenience this may be causing to road users. Safety is paramount, not only for road users but also to all of our engineers who are working on the scheme and lane closures will have to remain in place until the works are complete.

As the programme progresses we'll continue to provide regular updates through this page and our social media.

The M62 is a vital link to Hull and the rest of the county and the Ouse Bridge is vital in maintaining this link.

This project will repair the joint and we will re-open the lanes to all traffic as soon as possible, we will continue to provide updates as the project develops.

Safety of all road users and our workers is essential and this is why we need to install the contraflow. 

Documents

Traffic information

Information about scheduled roadworks and events on our motorways and major roads.

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